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The Art, Science, and Secrets of Scanning Young Children

Published:September 28, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2022.09.025
      Millions of people worldwide have health conditions arising from altered brain development. Treatments for these conditions must be optimized through mechanistic understanding from rigorous and replicable research. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can visualize and quantify brain structure and function throughout development. MRI is safe and noninvasive and can provide quantitative measurements of brain growth and maturation at high spatial resolution. Thus, MRI is a powerful and flexible tool for characterizing neurodevelopment (
      • Pollatou A.
      • Filippi C.A.
      • Aydin E.
      • Vaughn K.
      • Thompson D.
      • Korom M.
      • et al.
      An ode to fetal, infant, and toddler neuroimaging: Chronicling early clinical to research applications with MRI, and an introduction to an academic society connecting the field.
      ).
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