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Reply to: The Role of Molecular Clock Genes in Astrocytes of the Nucleus Accumbens in Reward- and Mood-Related Behavior in Mice

Published:September 19, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2022.07.008
      We thank Dr. Martini (

      Martini T (in press): The role of molecular clock genes in astrocytes of the nucleus accumbens in reward- and mood-related behavior in mice. Biol Psychiatry.

      ) for the positive review of our study (
      • Becker-Krail D.D.
      • Ketchesin K.D.
      • Burns J.N.
      • Zong W.
      • Hildebrand M.A.
      • DePoy L.M.
      • et al.
      Astrocyte molecular clock function in the nucleus accumbens is important for reward-related behavior.
      ), and for drawing our attention to the Martini et al. article in Scientific Reports (
      • Martini T.
      • Ripperger J.A.
      • Stalin J.
      • Kores A.
      • Stumpe M.
      • Albrecht U.
      Deletion of the clock gene Period2 (Per2) in glial cells alters mood-related behavior in mice.
      ), which was published at the time that our article was submitted. We were not aware of this study at the time and find the results to be really interesting. The statement we made in our article was that “no studies to date have investigated NAc astrocyte rhythmicity in the NAc and/or its potential role in regulating NAc function in the context of reward.” In light of the article published by Martini et al., we would soften this statement, though certain parts remain true because, to the best of our knowledge, our study is the first to demonstrate that astrocytes in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) have strong molecular rhythms and exhibit a high degree of diurnal rhythmicity at the transcriptome level. We apologize for the otherwise strong wording of our statement.
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      References

      1. Martini T (in press): The role of molecular clock genes in astrocytes of the nucleus accumbens in reward- and mood-related behavior in mice. Biol Psychiatry.

        • Becker-Krail D.D.
        • Ketchesin K.D.
        • Burns J.N.
        • Zong W.
        • Hildebrand M.A.
        • DePoy L.M.
        • et al.
        Astrocyte molecular clock function in the nucleus accumbens is important for reward-related behavior.
        Biol Psychiatry. 2022; 92: 68-80
        • Martini T.
        • Ripperger J.A.
        • Stalin J.
        • Kores A.
        • Stumpe M.
        • Albrecht U.
        Deletion of the clock gene Period2 (Per2) in glial cells alters mood-related behavior in mice.
        Sci Rep. 2021; 1112242

      Linked Article

      • The Role of Molecular Clock Genes in Astrocytes of the Nucleus Accumbens in Reward- and Mood-Related Behavior in Mice
        Biological Psychiatry
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          As an adaptation to life on Earth, mammalian physiology dramatically changes through the duration of the day, and these temporal programs are regulated by an internal timekeeping system (1). A recent publication by Becker-Krail et al. (1) explored the importance of the molecular clock gene Bmal1 in a brain region involved in reward- and mood-related behavior. However, the publication includes a bold claim. The authors falsely state that the described work is the first to explore the role of the circadian system in astrocytes of the nucleus accumbens (NAc).
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