Advertisement

Big or Little Data for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research in Psychiatry?

  • Ardesheer Talati
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Ardesheer Talati, Ph.D.
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York

    Division of Translational Epidemiology, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
    Search for articles by this author
  • Milenna T. van Dijk
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York

    Division of Translational Epidemiology, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
    Search for articles by this author
  • Myrna M. Weissman
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York

    Department of Epidemiology, Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York

    Division of Translational Epidemiology, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
    Search for articles by this author
      In recent years, there has been an impetus for larger magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of brain function and disease to obtain more robust findings. A recent article by Marek et al. in Nature (
      • Marek S.
      • Tervo-Clemmens B.
      • Calabro F.J.
      • Montez D.F.
      • Kay B.P.
      • et al.
      Reproducible brain-wide association studies require thousands of individuals.
      ) concluded that brain-wide association studies—studies “testing associations between individual variability in brain structure and function and cognitive or psychiatric symptoms”are currently underpowered and that casts of thousands are needed to obtain reproducible results. The study received considerable attention in the scientific community and an article in The New York Times Magazine (
      • Richtel M.
      Brain-imaging studies hampered by small data sets, study finds. The New York Times.
      ). The implications touched the work of many psychiatric researchers who see MRI as a tool to finally understand brain function and mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disorders.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Biological Psychiatry
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Marek S.
        • Tervo-Clemmens B.
        • Calabro F.J.
        • Montez D.F.
        • Kay B.P.
        • et al.
        Reproducible brain-wide association studies require thousands of individuals.
        Nature. 2022; 603: 654-660
        • Richtel M.
        Brain-imaging studies hampered by small data sets, study finds. The New York Times.
        (Available at:)
        • Gratton C.
        • Nelson S.M.
        • Gordon E.M.
        Brain-behavior correlations: Two paths toward reliability.
        Neuron. 2022; 110: 1446-1449
        • Hao X.
        • Talati A.
        • Shankman S.A.
        • Liu J.
        • Kaiser J.
        • Tenke C.E.
        • et al.
        Stability of cortical thinning in persons at increased familial risk for major depressive disorder across 8 years.
        Biol Psychiatry Cogn Neurosci Neuroimaging. 2017; 2: 619-625
        • Frodl T.
        • Janowiz D.
        • Schmaal L.
        • Tozzi L.
        • Dobrowolny H.
        • Stein D.J.
        • et al.
        Childhood adversity impacts on brain subcortical structures relevant to depression.
        J Psychiatr Res. 2017; 86: 58-65