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Reply to: Crossing the “Birth Border” for Epigenetic Effects

  • Megan G. McGill
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics and Mental Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Irina Pokhvisneva
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics and Mental Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Andrew S. Clappison
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics and Mental Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Lisa M. McEwen
    Affiliations
    Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
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  • Roseriet Beijers
    Affiliations
    Department of Developmental Psychology, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

    Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboudumc, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
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  • Marieke Tollenaar
    Affiliations
    Clinical Psychology Unit, Institute of Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands
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  • Hung Pham
    Affiliations
    Yale Child Study Center and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
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  • Michelle Z.L. Kee
    Affiliations
    Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science Technology and Research, Singapore
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  • Elika Garg
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics and Mental Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Euclides J. de Mendonça Filho
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Neerja Karnani
    Affiliations
    Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science Technology and Research, Singapore

    Bioinformatics Institute, Agency for Science Technology and Research, Singapore

    Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore
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  • Patricia P. Silveira
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics and Mental Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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  • Michael S. Kobor
    Affiliations
    Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

    Child and Brain Development Program, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • Carolina de Weerth
    Affiliations
    Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboudumc, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
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  • Michael J. Meaney
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics and Mental Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    Child and Brain Development Program, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science Technology and Research, Singapore

    Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore
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  • Kieran J. O’Donnell
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Kieran J. O’Donnell, Ph.D.
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics and Mental Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    Child and Brain Development Program, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Yale Child Study Center and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
    Search for articles by this author
      We thank Lahiri et al. (
      • Lahiri D.K.
      • Maloney B.
      • Song W.
      • Sokol D.K.
      Crossing the “birth border” for epigenetic effects.
      ) for their interest in our recent article in which we describe the potential fetal origins of epigenetic aging (
      • McGill M.G.
      • Pokhvisneva I.
      • Clappison A.S.
      • McEwen L.M.
      • Beijers R.
      • Tollenaar M.S.
      • et al.
      Maternal prenatal anxiety and the fetal origins of epigenetic aging.
      ). Owing to space constraints, a detailed review of the fetal origins literature was not possible in our original article. We now provide a short historical perspective below. We also direct readers to the following articles, which review the extension of the fetal origins framework to neurodevelopment and mental health phenotypes (
      • Van den Bergh B.R.H.
      • van den Heuvel M.I.
      • Lahti M.
      • Braeken M.
      • de Rooij S.R.
      • Entringer S.
      • et al.
      Prenatal developmental origins of behavior and mental health: The influence of maternal stress in pregnancy.
      ,
      • O'Donnell K.J.
      • Meaney M.J.
      Fetal origins of mental health: The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease Hypothesis.
      ,
      • Lindsay K.L.
      • Buss C.
      • Wadhwa P.D.
      • Entringer S.
      The interplay between nutrition and stress in pregnancy: Implications for fetal programming of brain development.
      ,
      • Entringer S.
      • Buss C.
      • Wadhwa P.D.
      Prenatal stress, development, health and disease risk: A psychobiological perspective-2015 Curt Richter Award Paper.
      ,
      • Monk C.
      • Lugo-Candelas C.
      • Trumpff C.
      Prenatal developmental origins of future psychopathology: Mechanisms and pathways.
      ,
      • O'Donnell K.
      • O'Connor T.G.
      • Glover V.
      Prenatal stress and neurodevelopment of the child: Focus on the HPA axis and role of the placenta.
      ,
      • O'Connor T.G.
      • Ciesla A.A.
      Maternal immune activation hypotheses for human neurodevelopment: Some outstanding questions.
      ,
      • Glover V.
      Annual Research Review: Prenatal stress and the origins of psychopathology: An evolutionary perspective.
      ).
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      References

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        Crossing the “birth border” for epigenetic effects.
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      Linked Article

      • Crossing the “Birth Border” for Epigenetic Effects
        Biological PsychiatryVol. 92Issue 4
        • Preview
          Studying how early life influences late-life outcomes continues to enrich our understanding of neuropsychiatric disorders. Manipulative experiments must be limited to animal models, and longitudinal surveys that unite records data and biological sampling are uncommon. Thus, McGill et al.’s (1) work is a welcome addition to the field. We offer the following analytical and conceptual comments and suggestions.
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