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The Indispensable Value of a Coherent Phenotypic Model of Psychopathology

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      Linked Article

      • Methods and Challenges for Assessing Heterogeneity
        Biological PsychiatryVol. 88Issue 1
        • Preview
          The widely acknowledged homogeneity assumption limits progress in refining clinical diagnosis, understanding mechanisms, and developing new treatments for mental health disorders. This homogeneity assumption drives both a comorbidity and a heterogeneity problem, where two different approaches tackle the problems. One, a unifying approach, tackles the comorbidity problem by assuming that a single general psychopathology factor underlies multiple disorders. Another, a multifactorial approach, tackles the heterogeneity problem by assuming that disorders comprise multiple subtypes driven by multiple discrete factors.
        • Full-Text
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      • Appropriate Use of Bifactor Analysis in Psychopathology Research: Appreciating Benefits and Limitations
        Biological PsychiatryVol. 88Issue 1
        • Preview
          Co-occurrence of psychiatric disorders is well documented. Recent quantitative efforts have moved toward an understanding of this phenomenon, with the general psychopathology or p-factor model emerging as the most prominent characterization. Over the past decade, bifactor model analysis has become increasingly popular as a statistical approach to describe common/shared and unique elements in psychopathology. However, recent work has highlighted potential problems with common approaches to evaluating and interpreting bifactor models.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF