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Reply to: Insight May Limit Identification of Eating Disorders

  • Tomoko Udo
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Tomoko Udo, Ph.D., School of Public Health, University at Albany, Health Policy, Management, and Behavior, 1 University Place, Rensselaer, NY 12144.
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Policy, Management, and Behavior, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, Rensselaer, New York
    Search for articles by this author
  • Carlos M. Grilo
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
    Search for articles by this author
Published:December 20, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.11.014
      In their letter to the editor, Brodrick and McAdams (
      • Brodrick B.
      • McAdams C.
      Insight may limit identification of eating disorders.
      ) raised two measurement-related concerns regarding our previous report (
      • Udo T.
      • Grilo C.M.
      Prevalence and correlates of DSM-5–defined eating disorders in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults.
      ) on the prevalence and correlates of eating disorders (EDs) based on DSM-5 criteria using data from the 2012 to 2013 National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III. This DSM-5–based study (
      • Udo T.
      • Grilo C.M.
      Prevalence and correlates of DSM-5–defined eating disorders in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults.
      ) reported lower prevalence estimates for both bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder and a lower persistence rate for anorexia nervosa (AN) than expected based on previous DSM-IV studies (
      • Brodrick B.
      • McAdams C.
      Insight may limit identification of eating disorders.
      ,
      • Hudson J.I.
      • Pope H.G.
      Evolving perspectives on the public health burden of eating disorders.
      ). We (
      • Udo T.
      • Grilo C.M.
      Prevalence and correlates of DSM-5–defined eating disorders in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults.
      ) and a commentary by Hudson and Pope (
      • Hudson J.I.
      • Pope H.G.
      Evolving perspectives on the public health burden of eating disorders.
      ) highlighted these discrepancies with the only other nationally representative U.S. survey—the 2001 to 2003 National Comorbidity Survey Replication (
      • Hudson J.I.
      • Hiripi E.
      • Pope Jr., H.G.
      • Kessler R.C.
      The prevalence and correlates of eating disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.
      )—and the World Health Organization Survey (
      • Kessler R.C.
      • Berglund P.A.
      • Chiu W.T.
      • Deitz A.C.
      • Hudson J.I.
      • Shahly V.
      • et al.
      The prevalence and correlates of binge eating disorder in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys.
      ), and discussed possible contributors to variations in prevalence estimates across studies (e.g., changes in diagnostic criteria, different interviews and interview structures such as length and ordering, fatigue, administration training methods, sampling, different date cohorts). Importantly, neither our (
      • Udo T.
      • Grilo C.M.
      Prevalence and correlates of DSM-5–defined eating disorders in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults.
      ) nor the Hudson et al. (
      • Hudson J.I.
      • Hiripi E.
      • Pope Jr., H.G.
      • Kessler R.C.
      The prevalence and correlates of eating disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.
      ) sensitivity analyses exploring the potential impacts of looser or stricter diagnostic definitions revealed any substantial effects on prevalence estimates.
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      Linked Article

      • Insight May Limit Identification of Eating Disorders
        Biological PsychiatryVol. 85Issue 11
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          We write in regard to the recent publication “Prevalence and Correlates of DSM-5–Defined Eating Disorders in a Nationally Representative Sample of U.S. Adults” (1). We previously obtained the same dataset from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions and became concerned about the ability of this structured phone interview (Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-5) to assess eating disorders. These results are reported both here and previously in Afifi et al.
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