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Indirect Targeting of Subsuperficial Brain Structures With Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Reveals a Promising Way Forward in the Treatment of Fear

  • Zachary T. Pennington
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Zachary T. Pennington, Ph.D., Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 1470 Madison Ave., Hess Building, Department of Psychiatry, Box 1230 - Cai Laboratory, New York, NY 10029.
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

    Staglin Center for Brain and Behavioral Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

    Department of Neuroscience, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
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  • Michael S. Fanselow
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

    Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

    Staglin Center for Brain and Behavioral Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
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      Linked Article

      • Prefrontal Cortex Stimulation Enhances Fear Extinction Memory in Humans
        Biological PsychiatryVol. 84Issue 2
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          Animal fear conditioning studies have illuminated neuronal mechanisms of learned associations between sensory stimuli and fear responses. In rats, brief electrical stimulation of the infralimbic cortex has been shown to reduce conditioned freezing during recall of extinction memory. Here, we translated this finding to humans with magnetic resonance imaging–navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).
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