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It Is Time to Look for New Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Can Sympathetic System Modulation Be an Answer?

      In a recent letter to the editor, Krystal et al. (
      • Krystal J.H.
      • Davis L.L.
      • Neylan T.C.
      • Raskind M.A.
      • Schnurr P.P.
      • Stein M.B.
      • et al.
      It is time to address the crisis in the pharmacotherapy of posttraumatic stress disorder: A consensus statement of the PTSD Psychopharmacology Working Group.
      ) noted that “There is an urgent need to address a critical lack of advancement in the psychopharmacologic treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)” (
      • Krystal J.H.
      • Davis L.L.
      • Neylan T.C.
      • Raskind M.A.
      • Schnurr P.P.
      • Stein M.B.
      • et al.
      It is time to address the crisis in the pharmacotherapy of posttraumatic stress disorder: A consensus statement of the PTSD Psychopharmacology Working Group.
      ). Most medications used on- or off-label for PTSD currently belong to typical categories of psychotropic medications. Current treatments that use psychotherapy and pharmaceuticals have a low success rate in the veteran population. With only 50% of veterans seeking care and a 40% recovery rate, current strategies will effectively reach no more than 20% of all veterans who need PTSD treatment (
      • Hoge C.W.
      Interventions for war-related posttraumatic stress disorder: Meeting veterans where they are.
      ).
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      1. Alkire MT, Hollifield M, Khoshsar R, Nguyen L, Alley SR, Reist C (2015): Neuroimaging suggests that stellate ganglion block improves post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) through an amygdala mediated mechanism. Presented at the American Society of Anesthesiology Annual Meeting, October 24–28, 2015, San Diego, California.

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