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Erratum to: “Ventral and Dorsal Striatum Networks in Obesity: Link to Food Craving and Weight Gain” by Contreras-Rodriguez et al. (Biol Psychiatry 2017; 81:789–796).

        Readers have brought an error in Figure 3 to the attention of the authors.
        Figure 3.
        Figure 3Change in body mass index associated with higher functional connectivity between the dorsal caudate (DC) and the somatosensory cortex (Montreal Neurological Institute coordinates, x = 46, y = −32, z = 62 mm) in excess-weight participants (n = 28): FChange 1,25 = 5.203, p = .03, R2 = .172.
        The published Figure 3 contains data from both participants with excess weight and participants with normal weight, whereas the corresponding regression analyses were conducted in participants with excess weight only (section “Prediction of BMI Change,” page 792). In addition, the figure and the corresponding analyses contain two data points per subject (right and left hemisphere), whereas they should include the averaged signal of both hemispheres. The authors have amended the figure (see corrected Figure 3, included here) and re-run the regression model with the averaged signal of both hemispheres (n = 28) and alpha = .05. The main finding does not change: the functional connectivity between the ventral putamen and the orbitofrontal cortex was not associated with body mass index change (FChange 1,25 = 0.005, p = .94, R2 = .00021), yet inclusion of the functional connectivity between the dorsal caudate and the somatosensory cortex showed statistically significant effects on body mass index (FChange 1,25 = 5.203, p = .03, R2 = .172).

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        • Ventral and Dorsal Striatum Networks in Obesity: Link to Food Craving and Weight Gain
          Biological PsychiatryVol. 81Issue 9
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            The food addiction model proposes that obesity overlaps with addiction in terms of neurobiological alterations in the striatum and related clinical manifestations (i.e., craving and persistence of unhealthy habits). Therefore, we aimed to examine the functional connectivity of the striatum in excess-weight versus normal-weight subjects and to determine the extent of the association between striatum connectivity and individual differences in food craving and changes in body mass index (BMI).
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