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Role of Cyfip2 in Binge Eating

  • Jian Feng
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Jian Feng, Ph.D., Department of Biological Science, Program in Neuroscience, Florida State University, 319 Stadium Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32306; .
    Affiliations
    Department of Biological Science, Program in Neuroscience, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida
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      Laboratory mice are widely used in current neuroscience research. Whereas we appreciate the extent of phenotypic variation among laboratory mouse strains, the underlying molecular genetic basis is still largely missing. Sequencing the complete genome of such mouse strains therefore not only demonstrates the mouse sequence diversity but also enables genetic screens on an unprecedented level. In fact, such sequence variations among laboratory mouse strains have been key to understanding the phenotypic alterations (
      • Keane T.M.
      • Goodstadt L.
      • Danecek P.
      • White M.A.
      • Wong K.
      • Yalcin B.
      • et al.
      Mouse genomic variation and its effect on phenotypes and gene regulation.
      ). For example, C57BL/6J is a major substrain of the widely used C57BL/6 strain, particularly in behavioral studies as well as various consortium works. Historically, a colony of C57BL/6J mice has been maintained at the National Institutes of Health, which became the C57BL/6NJ substrain. Though the two C57BL/6 substrains are very closely related, they are not genetically identical. C57BL/6J and C57BL/6NJ mice are also known for their behavioral differences. In this issue, Kirkpatrick et al. (
      • Kirkpatrick S.L.
      • Goldberg L.R.
      • Yazdani N.
      • Babbs R.K.
      • Wu J.
      • Reed E.R.
      • et al.
      Cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting protein 2 is a major genetic factor underlying binge eating.
      ) have successfully performed an exploratory screen to identify the DNA sequence basis of one phenotypic difference between the two C57BL/6 substrains: binge eating (BE).
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