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Altered Functional Connectivity Patterns Associated With Excess Body Weight: A Bias in Behavioral Control?

  • Laura H. Corbit
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Laura H. Corbit, Ph.D., The University of Sydney, School of Psychology, Brennan MacCallum Building (A18), Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.
    Affiliations
    School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
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      An alarming number of people worldwide are overweight or obese, posing significant health risks and leading to substantial individual and societal costs. The wide availability of highly palatable and calorically dense foods along with increasingly sedentary lifestyles make it easy to take in more calories than we burn. This leads to a calorie surplus that, over time, produces weight gain. It seems a simple solution to this epidemic should be to eat less and/or exercise more. However, the reality, as many dieters know firsthand, is not so simple. Even though many individuals attempt to control their weight through dieting, this typically has only temporary effects, and most dieters relapse to unhealthy habits and regain the weight that was lost within months (
      • Skender M.L.
      • Goodrick G.K.
      • Del Junco D.J.
      • Reeves R.S.
      • Darnell L.
      • Gotto A.M.
      • Foreyt J.P.
      Comparison of 2-year weight loss trends in behavioral treatments of obesity: Diet, exercise, and combination interventions.
      ,
      • Kraschnewski J.L.
      • Boan J.
      • Esposito J.
      • Sherwood N.E.
      • Lehman E.B.
      • Kephart D.K.
      • Sciamanna C.N.
      Long-term weight loss maintenance in the United States.
      ).
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      Linked Article

      • Ventral and Dorsal Striatum Networks in Obesity: Link to Food Craving and Weight Gain
        Biological PsychiatryVol. 81Issue 9
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          The food addiction model proposes that obesity overlaps with addiction in terms of neurobiological alterations in the striatum and related clinical manifestations (i.e., craving and persistence of unhealthy habits). Therefore, we aimed to examine the functional connectivity of the striatum in excess-weight versus normal-weight subjects and to determine the extent of the association between striatum connectivity and individual differences in food craving and changes in body mass index (BMI).
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