Advertisement

New Evidence Linking Obesity and Food Addiction

  • Elise C. Cope
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychology and Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey
    Search for articles by this author
  • Elizabeth Gould
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Elizabeth Gould, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Princeton Neuroscience Institute, 1-S-12 Green Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1010; .
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychology and Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey
    Search for articles by this author
      Obesity rates have skyrocketed over the past few decades. In the United States, approximately 35% of adults are now considered obese, with more than 60% categorized as overweight (

      National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (2012): Overweight and obesity statistics. NIH Publication No. 04-4158. Available at https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-statistics/Documents/stat904z.pdf. Accessed February 22, 2017.

      ). The health consequences of obesity are substantial. Obesity increases the risk of developing several debilitating conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and mental illness. Because the global obesity epidemic is generally believed to be caused by excessive caloric intake, there has been increasing interest in understanding the neurobiological mechanisms contributing to overeating, defined as continued eating in the absence of metabolic necessity leading to weight gain.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Biological Psychiatry
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

      1. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (2012): Overweight and obesity statistics. NIH Publication No. 04-4158. Available at https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-statistics/Documents/stat904z.pdf. Accessed February 22, 2017.

        • Randolph T.G.
        The descriptive features of food addiction; addictive eating and drinking.
        Q J Stud Alcohol. 1956; 17: 198-224
        • Volkow N.D.
        • Wang G.J.
        • Fowler J.S.
        • Telang F.
        Overlapping neuronal circuits in addiction and obesity: evidence of systems pathology.
        Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2008; 363: 3191-3200
        • Avena N.M.
        • Rada P.
        • Hoebel B.G.
        Evidence for sugar addiction: behavioral and neurochemical effects of intermittent, excessive sugar intake.
        Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2008; 32: 20-39
        • Ziauddeen H.
        • Farooqi I.S.
        • Fletcher P.C.
        Obesity and the brain: how convincing is the addiction model?.
        Nat Rev Neurosci. 2012; 13: 279-286
        • Brown R.M.
        • Kupchik Y.M.
        • Spencer S.
        • Garcia-Keller C.
        • Spanswick D.C.
        • Lawrence A.J.
        • et al.
        Addiction-like synaptic impairments in diet-induced obesity.
        Biol Psychiatry. 2017; 81: 797-806
        • Kasanetz F.
        • Deroche-Gamonet V.
        • Berson N.
        • Balado E.
        • Lafourcade M.
        • Manzoni O.
        • et al.
        Transition to addiction is associated with a persistent impairment in synaptic plasticity.
        Science. 2010; 328: 1709-1712
        • Tukey D.S.
        • Ferreira J.M.
        • Antoine S.O.
        • D׳amour J.A.
        • Ninan I.
        • Cabeza de Vaca S.
        • et al.
        Sucrose ingestion induces rapid AMPA receptor trafficking.
        J Neurosci. 2013; 33: 6123-6132
        • Oginsky M.F.
        • Maust J.D.
        • Corthell J.T.
        • Ferrario C.R.
        Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not in adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity.
        Psychopharmacology. 2016; 233: 773-784
        • Bocarsly M.E.
        • Fasolino M.
        • Kane G.A.
        • LaMarca E.A.
        • Kirschen G.W.
        • Karatsoreos I.N.
        • et al.
        Obesity diminishes synaptic markers, alters microglial morphology, and impairs cognitive function.
        Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015; 112: 15731-15736

      Linked Article

      • Addiction-like Synaptic Impairments in Diet-Induced Obesity
        Biological PsychiatryVol. 81Issue 9
        • Preview
          There is increasing evidence that the pathological overeating underlying some forms of obesity is compulsive in nature and therefore contains elements of an addictive disorder. However, direct physiological evidence linking obesity to synaptic plasticity akin to that occurring in addiction is lacking. We sought to establish whether the propensity to diet-induced obesity (DIO) is associated with addictive-like behavior, as well as synaptic impairments in the nucleus accumbens core considered hallmarks of addiction.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF