Advertisement

Sleep and Inflammation: Implications for Domain Approach and Treatment Opportunities

  • Roger S. McIntyre
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Roger S. McIntyre, M.D., F.R.C.P.C., University Health Network, 399 Bathurst Street, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5T 2S8.
    Affiliations
    Mood Disorder Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Department of Psychiatry, Department of Pharmacology, and Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
    Search for articles by this author
      Sleep disruption and/or alterations in sleep cycle or quality are identified within the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) matrix as a transdiagnostic phenomenology (
      • Irwin M.R.
      • Olmstead R.
      • Carroll J.E.
      Sleep disturbance, sleep duration, and inflammation: A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies and experimental sleep deprivation.
      ,
      • Insel T.
      • Cuthbert B.
      • Garvey M.
      • Heinssen R.
      • Pine D.S.
      • Quinn K.
      • et al.
      Research domain criteria (RDoC): Toward a new classification framework for research on mental disorders.
      ). In addition, sleep disturbances are highly associated with adverse psychiatric and physical health outcomes. Results from epidemiologic and clinical samples, as well as experimental sleep manipulation studies, provide convergent evidence that alterations in sleep are associated with reproducible abnormalities across multiple effector systems relevant to the pathophysiology of psychiatric and medical disorders (
      • Mullington J.M.
      • Haack M.
      • Toth M.
      • Serrador J.M.
      • Meier-Ewert H.K.
      Cardiovascular, inflammatory, and metabolic consequences of sleep deprivation.
      ,
      • Czeisler C.A.
      • Buxton O.M.
      • Khalsa S.B.S.
      The human circadian timing system and sleep-wake regulation A2.
      ). Observations of biological perturbation associated with sleep may inform a broader conceptual framework (i.e., RDoC) as it regards disease modeling in psychiatric and medical disorders. For example, sleep disturbance, and its associated neurobiological alterations, may be relevant to the vulnerability, direct causality, illness propagation, comorbidity, and treatment of psychiatric disorders (Figure 1).
      Figure 1.
      Figure 1Disturbances in sleep are a critical component of the shared pathogenetic nexus between psychiatric and cardiometabolic disorders.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Biological Psychiatry
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Irwin M.R.
        • Olmstead R.
        • Carroll J.E.
        Sleep disturbance, sleep duration, and inflammation: A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies and experimental sleep deprivation.
        Biol Psychiatry. 2016; 80: 40-52
        • Insel T.
        • Cuthbert B.
        • Garvey M.
        • Heinssen R.
        • Pine D.S.
        • Quinn K.
        • et al.
        Research domain criteria (RDoC): Toward a new classification framework for research on mental disorders.
        Am J Psychiatry. 2010; 167: 748-751
        • Mullington J.M.
        • Haack M.
        • Toth M.
        • Serrador J.M.
        • Meier-Ewert H.K.
        Cardiovascular, inflammatory, and metabolic consequences of sleep deprivation.
        Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2009; 51: 294-302
        • Czeisler C.A.
        • Buxton O.M.
        • Khalsa S.B.S.
        The human circadian timing system and sleep-wake regulation A2.
        in: Dement M.H. Kryger T. Roth W.C. Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine. 4th ed. W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia2005: 375-394
        • Swardfager W.
        • Walter S.
        • Rosenblat J.D.
        • Meriem B.
        • McIntyre R.S.
        Mapping inflammation onto mood: Inflammatory mediators of anhedonia.
        Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2016; 64: 148-166
        • Mansur R.B.
        • Brietzke E.
        • McIntyre R.S.
        Is there a “metabolic-mood syndrome”? A review of the relationship between obesity and mood disorders.
        Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2015; 52: 89-104
        • Kohsaka A.
        • Akira K.
        • Laposky A.D.
        • Ramsey K.M.
        • Carmela E.
        • Corinne J.
        • et al.
        High-fat diet disrupts behavioral and molecular circadian rhythms in mice.
        Cell Metab. 2007; 6: 414-421
        • Jackson M.L.
        • Butt H.
        • Ball M.
        • Lewis D.P.
        • Bruck D.
        Sleep quality and the treatment of intestinal microbiota imbalance in chronic fatigue syndrome: A pilot study.
        Sleep Sci. 2015; 8: 124-133
        • Kajeepeta S.
        • Gelaye B.
        • Jackson C.L.
        • Williams M.A.
        Adverse childhood experiences are associated with adult sleep disorders: a systematic review.
        Sleep Med. 2015; 16: 320-330
        • Pennestri M.-H.
        • Marie-Hélène P.
        • Ellen M.
        • Katherine O.
        • Vanessa L.
        • Andrée-Anne B.-T.
        • et al.
        Establishment and consolidation of the sleep-wake cycle as a function of attachment pattern.
        Attach Hum Dev. 2014; 17: 23-42

      Linked Article