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Reply to: Improving Research Standards to Restore Trust in Intranasal Oxytocin

  • Gareth Leng
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Gareth Leng, Ph.D., Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh, Hugh Robson Building, George Square, Edinburgh, Scotland EH9 8XD, United Kingdom.
    Affiliations
    Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom
    Search for articles by this author
  • Mike Ludwig
    Affiliations
    Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom
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Published:September 03, 2015DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2015.08.030
      In their thoughtful commentary, Carson et al. (
      • Carson D.S.
      • Yuan H.
      • Labuschagne I.
      Commentary on Leng and Ludwig (2015): Improving research standards to restore trust in intranasal oxytocin.
      ) point out that animal studies often show the same weaknesses that confuse the literature on intranasal oxytocin, and they make some important constructive comments on how research practice can and should be improved. We agree with many of their points.
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      Linked Article

      • Improving Research Standards to Restore Trust in Intranasal Oxytocin
        Biological PsychiatryVol. 79Issue 8
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          Leng and Ludwig (1) provide the much needed first step toward an open discussion regarding the quality of intranasal oxytocin research in humans. They further highlight a clear knowledge gap in the pharmacology of intranasal drug delivery. We provide pragmatic solutions for improving research standards in this field and outline extensive evidence supporting intranasal delivery of large molecules to the brain.
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