Advertisement

Reply to: Intranasal Oxytocin Mechanisms Can Be Better Understood, but Its Effects on Social Cognition and Behavior Are Not to Be Sniffed At

  • Gareth Leng
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Gareth Leng, Ph.D., Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh, Hugh Robson Bldg, George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9XD, Scotland, United Kingdom
    Affiliations
    Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland
    Search for articles by this author
  • Mike Ludwig
    Affiliations
    Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland
    Search for articles by this author
      We are very pleased that Quintana and Woolley (
      • Quintana D.S.
      • Woolley J.D.
      Intranasal oxytocin mechanisms can be better understood but its effects on social cognition and behavior are not to be sniffed at.
      ) have engaged with the issues raised in our review (
      • Leng G.
      • Ludwig M.
      Intranasal oxytocin: myths and delusions.
      ); we believe that the field is best advanced by frank exchanges that identify issues of concern and ways to resolve them. We address the points raised in the order that they raise them.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Biological Psychiatry
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Quintana D.S.
        • Woolley J.D.
        Intranasal oxytocin mechanisms can be better understood but its effects on social cognition and behavior are not to be sniffed at.
        Biol Psychiatry. 2015;
        • Leng G.
        • Ludwig M.
        Intranasal oxytocin: myths and delusions.
        Biol Psychiatry. 2016; 79: 243-250
        • Walum H.
        • Young L.J.
        Statistical and methodological considerations for the interpretation of intranasal oxytocin studies.
        Biol Psychiatry. 2016; 79: 251-257
        • Woolley J.
        • Chuang B.
        • Lam O.
        • Lai W.
        • O’Donovan A.
        • Rankin K.
        • et al.
        Oxytocin administration enhances controlled social cognition in patients with schizophrenia.
        Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2014; 47: 116-125
        • Davis M.C.
        • Lee J.
        • Horan W.P.
        • Clarke A.D.
        • McGee M.R.
        • Green M.F.
        • et al.
        Effects of single dose intranasal oxytocin on social cognition in schizophrenia.
        Schizophr Res. 2013; 147: 393-397
        • Striepens N.
        • Kendrick K.M.
        • Hanking V.
        • Landgraf R.
        • Wüllner U.
        • Maier W.
        • Hurlemann R.
        Elevated cerebrospinal fluid and blood concentrations of oxytocin following its intranasal administration in humans.
        Sci Rep. 2013; 3: 3440
      1. Quintana DS, Westlye LT, Rustan ØG, Tesli N, Poppy CL, Smevik H, et al. (in press): Low dose oxytocin delivered intranasally with Breath powered device affects social-cognitive behavior: A randomized 4-way crossover trial with nasal cavity dimension assessment. Transl Psychiatry.

      Linked Article

      • Intranasal Oxytocin Mechanisms Can Be Better Understood, but Its Effects on Social Cognition and Behavior Are Not to Be Sniffed At
        Biological PsychiatryVol. 79Issue 8
        • Preview
          The administration of intranasal oxytocin (OT) has demonstrated a wide range of effects on social behavior and cognition, which has led to its proposed use as a treatment for psychiatric disorders characterized by social cognition deficits. Leng and Ludwig (1) have raised many important issues in regard to intranasal OT research in their provocatively titled review. We wholeheartedly agree with the authors’ opinion that the mechanisms underlying intranasal OT are poorly understood (2). However, the authors appear to be making the case that the behavioral effects of OT are suspect because the specific mechanisms of the effect of intranasal OT on social behavior and cognition are not well known.
        • Full-Text
        • PDF