Advertisement

Hippocampal Subfields and Major Depressive Disorder

  • Benjamin Adam Samuels
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center, and Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, Inc., New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York.
    Search for articles by this author
  • E. David Leonardo
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center, and Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, Inc., New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York.
    Search for articles by this author
  • René Hen
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to René Hen, Ph.D., Departments of Neuroscience and Psychiatry, Center for Neurobiology & Behavior, Kolb Research Building 767, 722 W 168th Street, New York, NY 10032-2695
    Affiliations
    Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center, and Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, Inc., New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York.
    Search for articles by this author
      Affecting more than 20 million Americans every year, major depressive disorder (MDD) is a major burden on society. A 2011 World Health Organization report predicted that depression will be the leading cause of disease burden worldwide by 2030. With multiple distinct combinations of diverse signs and symptoms that can lead to a diagnosis, MDD is extremely heterogeneous. This heterogeneity suggests that dysfunction occurs across several different brain regions. Consistent with this idea, human imaging studies implicate areas such as the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. More specifically, several magnetic resonance imaging studies and meta-analyses have consistently found volumetric reductions in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus (
      • Koolschijn P.C.
      • van Haren N.E.
      • Lensvelt-Mulders G.J.
      • Hulshoff Pol H.E.
      • Kahn R.S.
      Brain volume abnormalities in major depressive disorder: A meta-analysis of magnetic resonance imaging studies.
      ). These volumetric effects can be partially reversed with antidepressant treatment. However, very few clinical studies have attempted to dissect these brain regions further and determine, for example, which subfields of the hippocampus are most sensitive to the course of MDD.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Biological Psychiatry
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Koolschijn P.C.
        • van Haren N.E.
        • Lensvelt-Mulders G.J.
        • Hulshoff Pol H.E.
        • Kahn R.S.
        Brain volume abnormalities in major depressive disorder: A meta-analysis of magnetic resonance imaging studies.
        Hum Brain Mapp. 2009; 30: 3719-3735
        • Leutgeb J.K.
        • Leutgeb S.
        • Moser M.B.
        • Moser E.I.
        Pattern separation in the dentate gyrus and CA3 of the hippocampus.
        Science. 2007; 315: 961-966
        • Fanselow M.S.
        • Dong H.W.
        Are the dorsal and ventral hippocampus functionally distinct structures?.
        Neuron. 2010; 65: 7-19
        • Samuels B.A.
        • Hen R.
        Neurogenesis and affective disorders.
        Eur J Neurosci. 2011; 33: 1152-1159
        • Boldrini M.
        • Santiago A.N.
        • Hen R.
        • Dwork A.J.
        • Rosoklija G.B.
        • Tamir H.
        • et al.
        Hippocampal granule neuron number and dentate gyrus volume in antidepressant-treated and untreated major depression.
        Neuropsychopharmacology. 2013; 38: 1068-1077
        • Monroe S.M.
        • Harkness K.L.
        Life stress, the “kindling” hypothesis, and the recurrence of depression: Considerations from a life stress perspective.
        Psychol Rev. 2005; 112: 417-445
        • Dranovsky A.
        • Leonardo E.D.
        Is there a role for young hippocampal neurons in adaptation to stress?.
        Behav Brain Res. 2012; 227: 371-375
        • Santarelli L.
        • Saxe M.
        • Gross C.
        • Surget A.
        • Battaglia F.
        • Dulawa S.
        • et al.
        Requirement of hippocampal neurogenesis for the behavioral effects of antidepressants.
        Science. 2003; 301: 805-809
        • Treadway M.T.
        • Waskom M.L.
        • Dillon D.G.
        • Holmes A.J.
        • Park M.T.M.
        • Chakravarty M.M.
        • et al.
        Illness progression, recent stress, and morphometry of hippocampal subfields and medial prefrontal cortex in major depression.
        Biol Psychiatry. 2015; 77: 285-294
        • Wu M.V.
        • Hen R.
        Functional dissociation of adult-born neurons along the dorsoventral axis of the dentate gyrus.
        Hippocampus. 2014; 24: 751-761