Advertisement

Nicotine, Striatum, and Reward

      The ability to resist an immediate, smaller reward to get a larger, delayed reward is impaired in current smokers (
      • Bickel W.K.
      • Miller M.L.
      • Yi R.
      • Kowal B.P.
      • Lindquist D.M.
      • Pitcock J.A.
      Behavioral and neuroeconomics of drug addiction: competing neural systems and temporal discounting processes.
      ) and is thought to reflect greater impulsivity that leads to relapse to cigarette smoking. Although studies have shown that this type of delay discounting is greater in abstinent smokers than in those who have smoked just before the test (
      • Field M.
      • Santarcangelo M.
      • Sumnall H.
      • Goudie A.
      • Cole J.
      Delay discounting and the behavioural economics of cigarette purchases in smokers: the effects of nicotine deprivation.
      ), it is not clear what role smoking status and acute effects of nicotine play on the brain circuits that are important for this reward processing. Activity of the dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and its target regions including the nucleus accumbens (NAc), striatum, and prefrontal cortical regions such as the anterior cingulate are important in delay discounting, predicting reward magnitude, decision making, and stimulus-reward learning (reviewed in [
      • Berridge K.C.
      The debate over dopamine's role in reward: the case for incentive salience.
      ]).
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Biological Psychiatry
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Bickel W.K.
        • Miller M.L.
        • Yi R.
        • Kowal B.P.
        • Lindquist D.M.
        • Pitcock J.A.
        Behavioral and neuroeconomics of drug addiction: competing neural systems and temporal discounting processes.
        Drug Alcohol Depend. 2007; 90: S85-S91
        • Field M.
        • Santarcangelo M.
        • Sumnall H.
        • Goudie A.
        • Cole J.
        Delay discounting and the behavioural economics of cigarette purchases in smokers: the effects of nicotine deprivation.
        Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2006; 186: 255-263
        • Berridge K.C.
        The debate over dopamine's role in reward: the case for incentive salience.
        Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2007; 191: 391-431
        • Rose E.J.
        • Ross T.J.
        • Salmeron B.J.
        • Lee M.
        • Shakleya D.M.
        • Huestis M.A.
        • et al.
        Acute nicotine differentially impacts anticipatory valence- and magnitude-related striatal activity.
        Biol Psychiatry. 2013; 73: 280-288
        • Day J.J.
        • Roitman M.F.
        • Wightman R.M.
        • Carelli R.M.
        Associative learning mediates dynamic shifts in dopamine signaling in the nucleus accumbens.
        Nat Neurosci. 2007; 10: 1020-1028
        • Schultz W.
        Predictive reward signal of dopamine neurons.
        J Neurophysiol. 1998; 80: 1-27
        • Saunders B.T.
        • Robinson T.E.
        The role of dopamine in the accumbens core in the expression of pavlovian-conditioned responses.
        Eur J Neurosci. 2012; 36: 2521-2532
        • Picciotto M.R.
        Nicotine as a modulator of behavior: beyond the inverted U.
        Tr Pharmacol Sci. 2003; 24: 493-499
        • Exley R.
        • Cragg S.J.
        Presynaptic nicotinic receptors: a dynamic and diverse cholinergic filter of striatal dopamine neurotransmission.
        Br J Pharmacol. 2008; 153: S283-S297
        • Franklin T.R.
        • Wang Z.
        • Wang J.
        • Sciortino N.
        • Harper D.
        • Li Y.
        • et al.
        Limbic activation to cigarette smoking cues independent of nicotine withdrawal: a perfusion fMRI study.
        Neuropsychopharmacology. 2007; 32: 2301-2309

      Linked Article