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Per-Symptomatic Brain Activations in Alcohol-Induced Hallucinosis

  • Vincent Laprevote
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author
    Affiliations
    CHU Nancy, Department of Addiction Medicine, Nancy

    CHU Nancy, Centre for Clinical Investigation CIC-INSERM 9501, Nancy
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  • Benjamin Rolland
    Affiliations
    Univ Lille Nord de France, Lille

    University Hospital of Lille (CHRU Lille), Addiction Medicine, General Psychiatry and Paediatric Psychiatry Departments, Lille
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  • Olivier Cottencin
    Affiliations
    Univ Lille Nord de France, Lille

    University Hospital of Lille (CHRU Lille), Addiction Medicine, General Psychiatry and Paediatric Psychiatry Departments, Lille
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  • Raymund Schwan
    Affiliations
    CHU Nancy, Department of Addiction Medicine, Nancy

    CHU Nancy, Centre for Clinical Investigation CIC-INSERM 9501, Nancy

    Univ Lorraine, Nancy
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  • Guillaume Vaiva
    Affiliations
    Univ Lille Nord de France, Lille

    University Hospital of Lille (CHRU Lille), Addiction Medicine, General Psychiatry and Paediatric Psychiatry Departments, Lille
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  • Pierre Thomas
    Affiliations
    Univ Lille Nord de France, Lille

    University Hospital of Lille (CHRU Lille), Addiction Medicine, General Psychiatry and Paediatric Psychiatry Departments, Lille

    Univ Lille Nord de France, Functional Neurosciences and Disorders Lab, Lille, France
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  • Renaud Jardri
    Affiliations
    University Hospital of Lille (CHRU Lille), Addiction Medicine, General Psychiatry and Paediatric Psychiatry Departments, Lille

    Univ Lorraine, Nancy

    Univ Lille Nord de France, Functional Neurosciences and Disorders Lab, Lille, France
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Published:November 05, 2012DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.09.009
      Alcohol-induced hallucinosis (AIH) is characterized by the occurrence of auditory hallucinations following alcohol consumption or cessation. These experiences may decline after a few weeks or months and must be distinguished from withdrawal syndrome by the absence of confusion (
      • Glass I.B.
      Alcoholic hallucinosis: A psychiatric enigma—1. The development of an idea.
      ). The current nosographic classifications include AIH among alcohol-induced psychotic disorders (
      World Health Organization
      International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision.
      ), which reach a lifetime prevalence of 4% among people with alcohol dependence (
      • Perälä J.
      • Kuoppasalmi K.
      • Pirkola S.
      • Härkänen T.
      • Saarni S.
      • Tuulio-Henriksson A.
      • et al.
      Alcohol-induced psychotic disorder and delirium in the general population.
      ). Whereas the pathophysiology of auditory hallucinations is increasingly being explored in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia (
      • Allen P.
      • Modinos G.
      • Hubl D.
      • Shields G.
      • Cachia A.
      • Jardri R.
      • et al.
      Neuroimaging auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia: from neuroanatomy to neurochemistry and beyond.
      ), the pathophysiology of hallucinations in AIH remains mysterious. We report here the case of a patient suffering from typical AIH who underwent capture functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during hallucinosis episodes.
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