Advertisement

Bithalamical Deep Brain Stimulation in Tourette Syndrome Is Associated with Reduction in Dopaminergic Transmission

      In recent years, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proven a suitable tool for improving symptoms in treatment-resistant Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) (
      • Neuner I.
      • Podoll K.
      • Janouschek H.
      • Michel T.M.
      • Sheldrick A.J.
      • Schneider F.
      From psychosurgery to neuromodulation: Deep brain stimulation for intractable Tourette syndrome.
      ,
      • Ackermans L.
      • Temel Y.
      • Visser-Vandewalle V.
      Deep brain stimulation in Tourette's syndrome.
      ). Under special circumstances (persisting symptoms in adulthood, unendurable distress, therapy resistance), DBS can be ethically regarded as an appropriate method of intervention (
      OCD-DBS Collaborative Group
      Deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders.
      ).
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Biological Psychiatry
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Neuner I.
        • Podoll K.
        • Janouschek H.
        • Michel T.M.
        • Sheldrick A.J.
        • Schneider F.
        From psychosurgery to neuromodulation: Deep brain stimulation for intractable Tourette syndrome.
        World J Biol Psychiatry. 2008; 11: 1-5
        • Ackermans L.
        • Temel Y.
        • Visser-Vandewalle V.
        Deep brain stimulation in Tourette's syndrome.
        Neurotherapeutics. 2008; 5: 339-344
        • OCD-DBS Collaborative Group
        Deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders.
        Neurosurgery. 2002; 51: 519
        • Vandewalle V.
        • Van Der Linden C.
        • Groenewegen H.J.
        • Caemaert J.
        Stereotactic treatment of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome by high frequency stimulation of thalamus.
        Lancet. 1999; 353: 724
        • Mink J.W.
        Basal ganglia dysfunction in Tourette's syndrome: A new hypothesis.
        Pediatr Neurol. 2001; 25: 190-198
        • Servello D.
        • Porta M.
        • Sassi M.
        • Brambilla A.
        • Robertson M.M.
        Deep brain stimulation in 18 patients with severe Gilles de la Tourette syndrome refractory to treatment: The surgery and stimulation.
        J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2008; 79: 136-142
        • Visser-Vandewalle V.
        • Temel Y.
        • Boon P.
        • Vreeling F.
        • Colle H.
        • Hoogland G.
        • et al.
        Chronic bilateral thalamic stimulation: A new therapeutic approach in intractable Tourette syndrome.
        J Neurosurg. 2003; 99: 1094-1100
        • Siessmeier T.
        • Zhou Y.
        • Buchholz H.G.
        • Landvogt C.
        • Vernaleken I.
        • Piel M.
        • et al.
        Parametric mapping of binding in human brain of D2 receptor ligands of different affinities.
        J Nucl Med. 2005; 46: 964-972
        • Vernaleken I.
        • Fellows C.
        • Janouschek H.
        • Brocheler A.
        • Veselinovic T.
        • Landvogt C.
        • et al.
        Striatal and extrastriatal D2/D3-receptor-binding properties of ziprasidone: A positron emission tomography study with [18F]Fallypride and [11C]raclopride (D2/D3-receptor occupancy of ziprasidone).
        J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2008; 28: 608-617
        • Cropley V.L.
        • Innis R.B.
        • Nathan P.J.
        • Brown A.K.
        • Sangare J.L.
        • Lerner A.
        • et al.
        Small effect of dopamine release and no effect of dopamine depletion on [18F]fallypride binding in healthy humans.
        Synapse. 2008; 62: 399-408