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Erratum

        Several typographical and nomenclature errors in Figure 1 and Table 1 have been identified in the September 15, 2006, issue of Biological Psychiatry, Volume 60, Issue 6, in the article “Novel, Replicated Associations Between Dopamine D3 Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Schizophrenia in Two Independent Samples” by Talkowski et al. (Biol Psychiatry 2006;60:570-577). The authors note that the errors, detailed below, do not alter the statistical analyses or their interpretation of the data.
        Figure thumbnail gr1
        Figure 1Dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) genomic organization and SNPs investigated in the U.S. sample. Known exons are numbered, as well as an additional exon (numbered 0) suggested by Anney et al. (
        • Anney R.J.
        • Rees M.I.
        • Bryan E.
        • Spurlock G.
        • Williams N.
        • Norton N.
        • Williams H.
        • Cardno A.
        • Zammit S.
        • Jones S.
        • et al.
        Characterisation, mutation detection, and association analysis of alternative promoters and 5’ UTRs of the human dopamine D3 receptor gene in schizophrenia.
        ). *Denotes associated SNP in U.S. analyses.
        Table 1SNP-Based Results Across Samples
        SNP #SNPLocationNucStrandAllele CodeU.S. SamplesIndia Trios
        Frequency of the allele provided in cases and controls.
        Freq. (Case/ Control)
        Trends test p-values from genotype distributions.
        Case-Control p-value
        GC Corrected p-value
        T = transmitted allele, NT = not transmitted allele (transmission disequilibrium test [TDT]).
        TDT (T/NT)
        TDT p-valueTDT (T/NT)TDT p-value
        1rs9055685’C+2.48/.37<.0001.000878/72.6251/470.69
        2rs23995045’C+1.82/.81.923.93349/36.1628/270.89
        rs76163675’A+2.74/.74.944.9566/43.02
        3rs13940165’T
        Nucleotide provided is designated as “other” allele, not “reference” allele by HapMap (2).
        2.37/.33.145.19477/62.264/460.07
        4rs15036705’G+1.63/.64.72.7583/65.1474/640.39
        5rs18008285’G1.80/.77.175.2362/39.0259/450.17
        6rs3240265’T
        Nucleotide provided is designated as “other” allele, not “reference” allele by HapMap (2).
        +2.69/.68.62.6678/59.170/560.21
        7rs6280ExonA
        Nucleotide provided is designated as “other” allele, not “reference” allele by HapMap (2).
        1.75/.67.001.00471/54.1370/600.36
        8rs324029IntronC
        Nucleotide provided is designated as “other” allele, not “reference” allele by HapMap (2).
        2.73/.72.855.8772/50.0460/420.07
        rs7625282IntronT2.77/.76.776.80671/45.01
        9rs324030IntronC
        Nucleotide provided is designated as “other” allele, not “reference” allele by HapMap (2).
        +2.72/.73.813.8372/49.0459/440.14
        10rs2134655IntronG2.73/.67.022.07565/53.2748/420.53
        11rs109342543’C1.44/.39.073.1280/57.0571/480.03
        Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) # is given in sequential order according to DRD3 transcription (5’ to 3’) from the most upstream (telomeric) to downstream (centromeric) SNP. SNP# is only given for SNPs assayed in both samples. Nuc = nucleotide.
        low asterisk Nucleotide provided is designated as “other” allele, not “reference” allele by HapMap (
        HapMap
        The International HapMap Project.
        ).
        a Frequency of the allele provided in cases and controls.
        b Trends test p-values from genotype distributions.
        c T = transmitted allele, NT = not transmitted allele (transmission disequilibrium test [TDT]).
        In Figure 1, rs7625287 should instead have read rs7625282. This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was otherwise identified correctly in both Table 1 and throughout the manuscript. Also, rs7616367 is now indicated with an asterisk as an associated SNP, rather than rs2399504 as previously indicated. Additionally, the order of rs1800828 and rs324026 was reversed and has now been corrected. The corrected Figure 1 appears below.
        In Table 1, the nucleotides were mismatched with their allele designations (1 or 2) and/or strand genotyped for eight SNPs. Nucleotide, strand designations, and/or allele codes (columns 4, 5, and 6) have been corrected so as to make them compatible with HapMap (
        HapMap
        The International HapMap Project.
        ) while retaining the integrity of the dataset presented in the manuscript. Allele codes “1” or “2” listed in the manuscript for the associated haplotypes have been retained. Also, the data for rs2399504 and rs7616367 was previously transposed for the US sample. All information is now corrected in Table 1, below.

        References

          • Anney R.J.
          • Rees M.I.
          • Bryan E.
          • Spurlock G.
          • Williams N.
          • Norton N.
          • Williams H.
          • Cardno A.
          • Zammit S.
          • Jones S.
          • et al.
          Characterisation, mutation detection, and association analysis of alternative promoters and 5’ UTRs of the human dopamine D3 receptor gene in schizophrenia.
          Mol Psychiatry. 2002; 7: 493-502
          • HapMap
          The International HapMap Project.
          Nature. 2003; 426: 789-796

        Linked Article

        • Novel, Replicated Associations Between Dopamine D3 Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Schizophrenia in Two Independent Samples
          Biological PsychiatryVol. 60Issue 6
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            Meta-analyses have suggested an association between schizophrenia (SZ) and a coding polymorphism (rs6280/Ser9Gly) at the dopamine D3 receptor gene (DRD3), but results have been inconsistent. Because most studies have evaluated only rs6280, the inconsistencies might reflect associations with other variants.
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          Biological PsychiatryVol. 63Issue 3
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            We thank Sand et al. for pointing out two inaccuracies in our article (1): a typographical error in our previously published Figure 1, and nomenclature problems in previously published Table 1. On the basis of these errors, Sand et al. suggest that our reported associations are invalid. Although we regret these errors, which are corrected herein, they do not alter our interpretation of the data, contrary to Sand et al.’s assertions.
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        • A Putative DRD3 Schizophrenia Risk Haplotype Deconstructed
          Biological PsychiatryVol. 63Issue 3
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            Talkowski et al. (1) have claimed an association of schizophrenia with the DRD3 gene in a study using a combined case-control and family-based approach. According to their findings, a five-marker haplotype was overtransmitted to affected offspring in two cohorts of Indian and U.S. origin and was also associated with the disease in a U.S.-based case-control study. Having reviewed these data, we wish to voice concerns over the results and their presentation.
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