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A Putative DRD3 Schizophrenia Risk Haplotype Deconstructed

Published:December 10, 2007DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2007.10.023
      Talkowski et al. (
      • Talkowski M.E.
      • Mansour H.
      • Chowdari K.V.
      • Wood J.
      • Butler A.
      • Varma P.G.
      • et al.
      Novel, replicated associations between dopamine D3 receptor gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia in two independent samples.
      ) have claimed an association of schizophrenia with the DRD3 gene in a study using a combined case-control and family-based approach. According to their findings, a five-marker haplotype was overtransmitted to affected offspring in two cohorts of Indian and U.S. origin and was also associated with the disease in a U.S.-based case-control study. Having reviewed these data, we wish to voice concerns over the results and their presentation.
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      References

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      Linked Article

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        Biological PsychiatryVol. 63Issue 3
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          We thank Sand et al. for pointing out two inaccuracies in our article (1): a typographical error in our previously published Figure 1, and nomenclature problems in previously published Table 1. On the basis of these errors, Sand et al. suggest that our reported associations are invalid. Although we regret these errors, which are corrected herein, they do not alter our interpretation of the data, contrary to Sand et al.’s assertions.
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      • Erratum
        Biological PsychiatryVol. 63Issue 3
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          Several typographical and nomenclature errors in Figure 1 and Table 1 have been identified in the September 15, 2006, issue of Biological Psychiatry, Volume 60, Issue 6, in the article “Novel, Replicated Associations Between Dopamine D3 Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Schizophrenia in Two Independent Samples” by Talkowski et al. (Biol Psychiatry 2006;60:570-577). The authors note that the errors, detailed below, do not alter the statistical analyses or their interpretation of the data.
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