Advertisement

218. HPA axis regulation in premenopausal women with PTSD

  • A.M. Rasmusson
    Affiliations
    National Center for PTSD, Neuroscience Division, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT 06516, USA &

    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • D.S. Lipschitz
    Affiliations
    National Center for PTSD, Neuroscience Division, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT 06516, USA &

    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • S. Wang
    Affiliations
    National Center for PTSD, Neuroscience Division, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT 06516, USA &

    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • J.D. Bremner
    Affiliations
    National Center for PTSD, Neuroscience Division, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT 06516, USA &

    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • S.M. Southwick
    Affiliations
    National Center for PTSD, Neuroscience Division, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT 06516, USA &

    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • D.S. Charney
    Affiliations
    National Center for PTSD, Neuroscience Division, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT 06516, USA &

    Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
    Search for articles by this author
      A limited number of previous hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function studies in women with PTSD have revealed enhanced dexamethasone suppression of plasma cortisol, low 24-hour urine cortisol levels in postmenopausal Holocaust survivors, and high 24-hour urine cortisol in a group of premenopausal women with histories of abuse. We therefore undertook a study of premenopausal women with chronic PTSD to assess HPA axis function from several vantage points. Results of a CRF stimulation test (1 ug/kg ovine CRF IV at 8:00 p.m. with plasma measurements at −15, 0, +15, +45, +60, +90, and +120′ after injection) in 12 women with PTSD and 11 nontraumatized controls revealed: a) no difference in baseline cortisol or ACTH between the PTSD and non-traumatized control groups, b) a significant increase in the plasma ACTH response in the PTSD group, c) a significant increase in the plasma cortisol response and a delay in the cortisol peak in the PTSD group and d) a trend for an increase in the plasma cortisol response to CRF during the follicular compared to the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle in both groups. One previous CRF study in male combat veterans with PTSD showed blunted ACTH and normal cortisol responses in the PTSD group. This suggests that PTSD, gender, and menstrual cycle phase may exert unique influences on pituitary and adrenal responses to CRF. Results of ACTH stimulation and dexamethasone suppression tests, as well as measurements of 24-hour urine cortisol also will be presented.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Biological Psychiatry
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect