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Ventral Capsule/Ventral Striatum Deep Brain Stimulation Does Not Consistently Diminish Occipital Cross-Frequency Coupling

Published:December 18, 2015DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2015.10.029
      Bahramisharif et al. (
      • Bahramisharif A.
      • Mazaheri A.
      • Levar N.
      • Schuurman P.R.
      • Figee M.
      • Denys D.
      Deep brain stimulation diminishes cross-frequency coupling in obsessive-compulsive disorder.
      ) reported that deep brain stimulation (DBS) delivered to the ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS) target for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) decreased beta-gamma cross-frequency coupling (CFC) in electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from the occipital cortex. They suggested that this may represent changes in bottom-up visual processing that may make disorder-related stimuli exceptionally salient. They further noted a recent report of DBS-induced changes in motor cortex beta-gamma coupling during DBS for Parkinson’s disease (PD) (
      • de Hemptinne C.
      • Swann N.C.
      • Ostrem J.L.
      • Ryapolova-Webb E.S.
      • San Luciano M.
      • Galifianakis N.B.
      • Starr P.A.
      Therapeutic deep brain stimulation reduces cortical phase-amplitude coupling in Parkinson’s disease.
      ) as potentially supporting that hypothesis.
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      Linked Article

      • Deep Brain Stimulation Diminishes Cross-Frequency Coupling in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
        Biological PsychiatryVol. 80Issue 7
        • Preview
          Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to be an effective treatment for neurologic disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD) (1) and psychiatric disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (2). However, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic benefits of DBS are still unclear. A recent groundbreaking study reported that DBS of the basal ganglia in patients with PD is able to suppress cross-frequency coupling (CFC) between beta phase and broadband gamma amplitude over the motor cortex (3).
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      • Reply to: Ventral Capsule/Ventral Striatum Deep Brain Stimulation Does Not Consistently Diminish Occipital Cross-Frequency Coupling
        Biological PsychiatryVol. 80Issue 7
        • Preview
          While there is overall consensus on how deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia of Parkinson’s patients leads to symptom reduction benefits, the precise therapeutic mechanism of such stimulation in psychiatric disorders is still a matter of investigation. We recently proposed that the high-frequency stimulation of the internal capsule of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) could disrupt the degree of rhythmicity (i.e., phase preservation) of ongoing oscillations generated at the cortex, which would subsequently reduce the connectivity of the cortex with subcortical areas (1).
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