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Research Article| Volume 21, ISSUE 12, P1167-1174, October 1986

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Smooth pursuit eye movement disorder and its psychobiologic correlates in unmedicated schizophrenics

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      Abstract

      The accuracy of smooth pursuit eye movements (SPEMs) was evaluated electrooculographically in 14 medication-free schizophrenics. Concentrations of monoamine metabolites and gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) were measured in their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Ventricular-brain ratios (VBR) were determined by computed axial tomography (CT scan). Premorbid adjustment was evaluated by the Phillips Scale. The SPEMs of eight of the patients were reevaluated after 2 weeks of treatment with either prazosin or pimozide. No consistent significant correlations were found between SPEM accuracy and CSF metabolite concentrations, VBR, or premorbid adjustment. SPEM accuracy was not correlated with number of days off medication and was significantly correlated when measured before and during medication.
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